Letters 9-24-13


Boost our economy with energy exports

Starting with universal health care, there are many things we need in Hawaii County that we can’t pay for, like better roads, parks and schools. The reason we can’t is that our tax base is too thin. If you look at the world’s most prosperous economies (e.g. Japan, China, Germany, Australia) they have one thing in common, they are export based. They make or mine something of value that they sell to the rest of the world at a profit.

Hawaii once prospered by exporting agricultural products, but that market has become so competitive that the margin is too thin to support a 20th century life style, likewise tourism. What’s left that we have in abundance that anyone can use? Energy: solar wind, ocean, geothermal and biofuels. All of these are being exploited safely and cleanly with modern technology and only a fool turns down such a precious gift.

Ken Obenski

Kaohe

Mongoose are taking over walking trail

Many, many people enjoy the Old Kona Airport Park on a daily basis. I am one of them.

It has become apparent to several of us that the mongoose population at the park is out of control. These vicious rodents seem to be experiencing a population explosion in the area. And they are becoming more acclimated to people and are fearless. They do not run away when approached on the paved walking surface. They tend to stand their ground. I observed one chasing and nipping a cat. I’ve heard tell that they have actually attacked a cat, biting off the cat’s tail.

If they lose fear of humans, then what? We understand that they are doing so well because they enjoy the food left for the feral cats — which is another issue but an issue that is being addressed by the many volunteers who make sure the cats are provided for on a daily basis.

This letter is to request that mayor’s office address this mongoose issue with animal control, and efforts be put in place to reduce the mongoose population at the park. It will have to be an ongoing campaign since there are so many. Total elimination is highly unlikely, but reduction in the population is possible and could result in a reduction of aggressive behavior.

Come on folks lets try to rid the park of these four-legged mean machines.

Paul Kaminski

Kailua-Kona