Letters 8-13-13


Gov. Abercrombie: Respect the process

The West Hawaii fisheries rule package has made its way through the state administrative rule making process. After more than a decade of meetings, the Board of Land and Natural Resources passed it. If Chairman William Aila ever sends it to the governor’s office, we are asking the governor to expeditiously sign his approval so that these important amendments can go into effect.

There is talk that Abercrombie may not sign the rules package. In fact, there is talk that some groups who are against this package are planning on repealing Act 306, which created FRA’s (protection zones) along 35 percent of our coast.

This Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at Kealakehe Intermediate School, there will be a chance to show your support for this package and for our reefs. The governor will be on island. Please attend and let your support be heard.

There are many folks who think this package isn’t enough, and others think it’s too much. However, it has taken over a decade of work between very diverse groups to make this happen, and the BLNR has approved it. This package is a compromise, and it is a good one. It offers many more protections than we have now while still affording almost identical incomes to current aquarium fishermen.

Our group is thankful that most of the active commercial collectors in West Hawaii have voluntarily agreed to stay out of Kaohe Bay, even though there is no legal reason that they should. This act of cooperation has not been overlooked by those of us who use the beach often. However, it’s necessary to formalize this arrangement. New collectors are constantly arriving. Rules need to be in place.

Dismissing the rule package is reckless and puts the entire state administrative rule making process at risk. Aila’s and the governor’s cavalier attitude is already resulting in many people losing faith in our state government leaders and all important community-based management. It is one thing to run on an environmental platform. It is another to actually support the changes and progress that are part and parcel of that platform.

Please ask the governor to support the West Hawaii amendments package.

Please attend the meeting on Thursday.

Susan Kellam

Friends of Pebble Beach

Instead of stalling, build around rare tree

Concerning the uhiuhi tree that appears to be stalling the building of a new Judiciary complex, Hugo von Platen Luder suggested transplanting it elsewhere.

It would seem more prudent to build around it, along with a plaque describing it and its endangered status. Often times, transplanting trees or even palms that have germinated by natural selection and acclimation, suffer dieback, stunting or death. A substantial buffer zone from its trunk to a rock wall would offer protection and seed collection. The seeds are readily propagated with 100 percent germination results documented.

Dennis L. Lawson

Kona