Letters 6-17-13


Beach

Kona needs a dog park

In response to Keola Weza’s letter of May 30: The first instinctive question that comes to my mind — why on earth would you be taking your wife and four children to a “dog beach” where according to you, “the beach is littered with dog feces and the water has dog hair floating on the surface?No responsible dog owner would leave feces on the beach or anywhere else. These are the very folks that elicit a bad name for accountable dog owners. I believe the area you call “dog beach” is the only legal area that allows owners to take their dogs to the beach. If I were you, I could certainly find a much more suitable beach for my family.

What really prompted my response to Mr. Weza is the fact that a small group of dog owners has been involved in trying to establish a legally sanctioned dog park in Kailua-Kona. His letter to the editor actually makes the powerful case for a dog park. On the drawing board is a dog park that would be an integral part of the new Humane Society location. Much like many other projects, lack of immediate funds has postponed its move to the new location, including the dog park becoming a reality in the near term.

I would ask all dog lovers and owners to aid our Humane Society in any way they can so that we might see a legal/legitimate dog park come to fruition here in Kailua-Kona.

Jim and Helga Hans

Kailua-Kona

Sign waving

Community has right to express its views

I was there that day on Queen Kaahumanu Highway and I witnessed the accident that happened.

Kohanaiki is becoming more popular. There are those who are not informed or choose not to drive to OTEC to then turn left and head south to the Kohanaiki entrance. But I have to say the luxury developer landowner should have foreseen a left turn out was needed. Not just for the safety of the community, but for the many construction trucks and employees who are working for them. On numerous occasions I have seen construction trucks make an illegal left turn.

I agree with the woman who wrote that sign waving is dangerous and distracting. But as rents on businesses go up and the also the cost of fuel and food, and our representatives don’t stand up for what the community wants, you are going to see more sign waving.

Sign waving is a way to get the information to the community — and the community has a right to know.

For that day, the message was public access to a beach that is core to this community.

Colleen Sullivan

Kona