Letters 11-18-2012


Highway patrol

It’s not needed here

The letter from John Young regarding the need for a county highway patrol is so ludicrous that I feel the need to reply.

Basically, we have a lot of police officers in the County of Hawaii and most of them, if they are not flagging traffic or providing a caravan for the military, are busy watching the highway.

Unfortunately this is usually done from hiding behind a bush and radioing ahead to stop a dangerous desperado who has picked up his cell phone, stopped with his bumper across the white line, let his small dog loose in the car, or forgotten his seat belt, safety inspection, or registration. (By the way check the safety inspection on the police vehicles on the road and you would be surprised by how many are expired.)

As far as being on his way to investigate a burglary, or going after a drug dealer — if only it were true. The fact is this nepotistic, high school-educated force of kanakas couldn’t solve a minor crime if they saw it in process.

The officer in the letter stated that he wasn’t going to stop anyone because that would add to his already full plate. Plate of what? Evidently, his bento lunch to add to his already bulging waistline.

Let’s get these officers some more training and get them out from behind the bush.

Writing as many tickets as you can simply to pay your wage is not benefiting the people.

Writing a seat belt violation to a pick up driver who has four people lounging in the bed of a pickup seems to make little sense.

It’s time for some educated decisions being made at the top. Is that the mayor or the chief of police?

James Krzeminski

Kailua-Kona

Fish collecting

What is taken is lost to the rest of us

I was appalled by the headline. After that terrible waste of tropical fish on Honokohau Harbor the other year, I voiced my opinion on fish collecting and you have to ask the question?

Of course the numbers are down. Those who rape our shores of those beautiful creatures should all be fined or jailed.

Unlike trees that can be replanted, we cannot replace tropical fish in the same way. Most creatures like these do not breed in captivity.

What’s taken is lost to the rest of us —for good. It’s unfortunate that ignorant individuals will continue to take fish from their natural habitat and sell them for money.

When one of my former students said, “That’s what my uncle does,” I thought, what a sad world this is. Maybe we don’t deserve to have God’s creatures for our enjoyment.

Colleen Wallis

Kailua-Kona