In Brief | Nation & World


Conn. fair accident sends kids falling to ground when swing ride loses power; 13 hurt

NORWALK, Conn. — Thirteen children were injured when a festival attraction that swings riders into the air lost power at a community fair in Connecticut on Sunday afternoon, authorities said.

Most of the children suffered minor injuries and were treated at the Oyster Festival in Norwalk, police said. But several others were more seriously hurt and taken to local hospitals, according to authorities.

One hospital reported three in stable condition and another reported three were being evaluated. Victims were also reportedly taken to a third hospital.

It wasn’t clear how far off the ground they were when they fell.

Norwalk police called in the state fire marshal’s office to investigate.

NAACP President Jealous plans to step down after 5 years at civil rights organization

WASHINGTON — Benjamin Jealous, the president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said Sunday that he plans to step down at the end of the year.

The Baltimore-based NAACP is the nation’s largest civil rights organization. When Jealous was hired as its president in 2008 at age 35, he became the youngest leader in the group’s history. Over the past five years, the group said its rosters of online activists and donors have grown tremendously.

In a written statement Sunday, Jealous, 40, said he plans to pursue teaching at a university and wants to spend time with his young family.

“The NAACP has always been the largest civil rights organization in the streets, and today it is also the largest civil rights organization online, on mobile and at the ballot box too,” Jealous said. “I am proud to leave the association financially sound, sustainable, focused, and more powerful than ever.”

Jealous plans to step down on Dec. 31. His departure plans were first reported by USA Today.

Russian opposition leader finishes 2nd in strong showing in Moscow mayoral race

MOSCOW — Opposition leader Alexei Navalny swept up far more votes than expected Sunday while finishing second in Moscow’s mayoral election, a pivotal contest that has energized Russia’s small opposition in ways that could pose a risk to the Kremlin in the days and years ahead.

Partial results released early Monday showed Navalny with about 27 percent of the vote, while the Kremlin-backed incumbent, Sergei Sobyanin, held a clear lead with about 52 percent. Exit polls, however, predicted Navalny would get as much as 32 percent.

As the results only began to trickle out two hours after the polls closed, Navalny said he suspected the vote count was being manipulated.

“We don’t recognize the results that are currently being announced, and I would like to say that we won’t give up one vote that we received,” Navalny told reporters at his campaign headquarters late Sunday. “I call on the Kremlin and the mayor’s office to restrain themselves from falsifications.”

The election was being watched for what it bodes for the future of the opposition and for Navalny. He faces time in prison after being convicted of embezzlement in a case seen as part of a Kremlin effort to sideline him, but his strong showing could lead to a shortening of his five-year sentence, if the Kremlin feels this would help defuse discontent.

By wire sources