In Brief | Nation & World


Muslim Brotherhood leader detained

CAIRO — The Muslim Brotherhood’s top leader looked somber and fatigued after his arrest Tuesday, his demeanor mirroring the Islamist movement’s predicament following its stunning fall from power and a deadly government crackdown.

The Brotherhood’s decision to play hardball after the military’s ouster of Egypt’s Islamist president has backfired, leaving it embroiled in a crisis and looking at unattractive choices: Aligning with hard-line groups in an insurgency that almost certainly will fail or going underground in the hope of resurfacing one day.

Regardless of which path it chooses, the Brotherhood’s grim future will impact Islamic groups across the Middle East and beyond. The Egyptian organization is something of a “mother ship” that has inspired their creation and provided a role model of the political Islam they want to prevail.

“It looks like it’s over for the Brotherhood,” said Sameh Eid, a former member who has maintained contact with the group. “Brotherhood families are grieving over their dead or busy trying to see how they can visit loved ones in detention or others who are injured. The animosity on the streets is exhausting them and allies are abandoning them.”

Shots fired at Atlanta-area school

DECATUR, Ga. — A man with an assault rifle and other weapons exchanged gunfire with officers Tuesday at an Atlanta-area elementary school before surrendering, a police chief said, with dramatic overhead television footage capturing the young students racing out of the building, being escorted by teachers and police to safety.

No one was injured.

Just a week into the new school year, more than 800 students in pre-kindergarten to fifth grade were evacuated from Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy in Decatur, a few miles east of Atlanta.

They sat outside along a fence in a field for a time until school buses came to take them to their waiting parents and other relatives at a nearby Wal-Mart.

When the first bus arrived about three hours after the shooting, cheers erupted in the store parking lot from relieved relatives, several of them sobbing.

The suspect, identified later as 20-year-old Michael Brandon Hill, fired at least a half-dozen shots from the rifle from inside McNair at officers who were swarming the campus outside, the chief said. Officers returned fire when the man was alone and they had a clear shot, DeKalb County Police Chief Cedric L. Alexander said at a news conference.

Hill surrendered shortly after and several weapons were found, though it wasn’t clear how many, Alexander said. Police had no motive.

3 teens charged in death of Australian

DUNCAN, Okla. — With a motive that’s both chilling and simple — to break up the boredom of an Oklahoma summer — three teenagers randomly targeted an Australian collegiate baseball player who was attending school in the U.S. and killed him for fun, prosecutors said Tuesday as they charged two of the boys with murder.

Prosecutor Jason Hicks called the boys “thugs” as he described how Christopher Lane, 22, of Melbourne, was shot once in the back and died along a tree-lined road on Duncan’s well-to-do north side.

He said the three teens, from the grittier part of town, chose Lane at random and that one of the boys “thinks it’s all a joke.”

Hicks charged Chancey Allen Luna, 16, and James Francis Edwards Jr., 15, of Duncan with first-degree murder. Under Oklahoma law they will be tried as adults. Michael Dewayne Jones, 17, of Duncan was charged with using a vehicle in the discharge of a weapon and with accessory to first-degree murder after the fact. He is considered a youthful offender but will be tried in adult court.

By wire sources