Subscribe to Opinion RSS feed

Opinion

Hillary Clinton’s use of private email reflects poor judgment

Hillary Rodham Clinton has served as first lady, a senator from New York and secretary of state. She is no newcomer to the corridors of power. Her decision to exclusively use a private email account while secretary suggests she made a deliberate decision to shield her messages from scrutiny. It was a mistake that reflects poor judgment about a public trust.

Stopping the IRS

WASHINGTON — Rep. Peter Roskam is now chairman of the Ways and Means subcommittee whose jurisdiction includes oversight of the Internal Revenue Service, and hence of Lois Lerner’s legacy. He knows how interesting her career was before she, as head of the IRS exempt-organizations division, directed the suppression of conservative advocacy groups by delaying and denying them the tax exempt status that was swiftly given to comparable liberal groups.

Worthy of a response

The concerns about a prospective nuclear agreement with Iran raised by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a speech to Congress on Tuesday are not — as the White House was quick to point out — new. They had, for example, been spelled out in Senate hearings. Netanyahu’s decision to repeat this case before a joint meeting of Congress in defiance of the White House and leading Democrats risked turning what should be a substantive debate into a partisan scrimmage.

Jeb Bush, CPAC pinata

It happened just as Jeb Bush was about to explain why he thinks conservatives need to stop being perceived as “anti-everything”: Attendees at the Conservative Political Action Conference let it be known that, as part of their anti-everythingness, they are also anti-Bush.

Getting Africa’s health systems to be self-reliant

DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania — After a storied history of revolutionary defiance toward America — in which Tanzania played host to Angela Davis, Huey Newton and Malcolm X — this country can hardly get enough of the U.S. of A. Rumors still float among cabbies and tour guides that George W. Bush bought land here during his 2008 visit and plans on returning. When President Barack Obama came in 2013, a main road, running scenically along the Indian Ocean, was renamed in his honor: Barack Obama Drive.

US needs to rework its byzantine food safety system

The job of keeping our food wholesome has become more difficult as food itself has become more complicated. Because processed foods include ingredients from many sources, it is hard to trace the origin of pathogens. A package of ground beef, for instance, is no longer put together by a butcher pushing a single hunk of meat through a grinder; these days it includes trimmings from many cattle and multiple slaughterhouses. That means even a small quantity of meat contaminated with E. coli has the potential to taint tremendous amounts of hamburger meat sent out across the country.

Twitter as America’s conscience

WASHINGTON — Denizens of social media were rankled during Sunday night’s Academy Awards telecast when actor Sean Penn made a crack about Mexican director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and green cards.

Contests and Promotions

WHT-promo-generic_125x130.jpg
Subscribe
Click Here

Finally, a health care alternative that’s worth discussing

A viable Republican substitute for the health care act used to be the yeti of Capitol Hill: often talked about, never seen. But it has suddenly become real. Last week, three leading Republican members of Congress offered a realistic plan for reform, one that accepts the need to provide all Americans access to health insurance.

The FCC needs to do as much as it can to whittle down Title II

Since the Federal Communications Commission set out to preserve the free and open nature of the Internet more than a decade ago, there’s never been a question about the importance of that goal. Instead, the often bitter debate has been over how to achieve it. The latest proposal from FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler — to impose the strictest rules yet on Internet service providers, including mobile networks — will almost certainly draw challenges in the courts and from Republicans in Congress. But Wheeler and his allies make a persuasive case that the more permissive approach favored by Comcast, AT&T and other ISPs won’t protect consumers and competition in the long run.

Education is the business of the states

WASHINGTON — In 1981, Tennessee’s 41-year-old governor proposed to President Ronald Reagan a swap: Washington would fully fund Medicaid and the states would have complete responsibility for primary and secondary education. Reagan, a former governor, was receptive. But Democrats, who controlled the House and were beginning to be controlled by teachers unions (the largest, the National Education Association, had bartered its first presidential endorsement, of Jimmy Carter, for creation of the Department of Education) balked.

How patient should Fed be in raising interest rates? Very

With a pretty solid recovery now under way and the unemployment rate way down from its recession-era peak, the Federal Reserve is wondering when to start raising interest rates. It has said it will be “patient” — which investors have taken to mean “not before the middle of this year.” That might not be patient enough.

Seeking a vaccine for ignorance

WASHINGTON — Flashback: Galileo is under house arrest pondering the unyielding ignorance of The Church for refusing to consider his heliocentric proposition that the Earth circled the sun.

A TPP reality check

As the Obama administration and a Republican-majority Congress work toward eventual approval of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement between the United States and 11 Pacific Rim nations, opponents of the proposed pact are issuing increasingly shrill warnings. The latest is that the deal will endanger not only U.S. jobs but also U.S. health care — and health care around the world. According to the critics, U.S. efforts to protect the pharmaceutical industry’s intellectual-property rights and commercial interests could result in higher drug prices and lower access — not only along the Pacific Rim but also in the United States. The TPP means “worse health and unnecessary deaths,” Joseph Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate in economics, warns.