Letters 1-5-14


Keep giving tickets, speeders deserve them

So easy to do. Slow down.

The police are there to save lives and for drivers to obey speed limit signs. Do not expect the police to educate you. There’s no need to. You should have been educated before you got your driver’s license. You should not be driving.

The numbers on those signs are not lottery numbers; they are speed limit numbers. Remember that, and obey speed limit signs.

I’ve driven on Saddle Road, and speeders fly by like I’m standing still. It’s also not only on Saddle Road, it’s happening on Queen Kaahumanu Highway — one taken on solid double lines.

You’re at fault when you get tickets.

Keep giving the tickets. Speeders deserve them.

B. Pontis

Kona

Kudos to Kona police officers

I would like to personally thank our local police and especially officer Paraino for their quick response and apprehension of the burglar who came into our house while we were sleeping and helped himself to our stuff. I called for help about 7:20 and they were here in no time and had the perpetrator in custody an hour later.

It’s too often that we see and hear about the poor quality of our police department and I think that it’s only fair to say that what I experienced was a level of professionalism second to none.

Tom Walton

Kailua-Kona

Driver’s license carries responsibilities

Your article, “Saddle Road Speeding Citations Draw Fire,” in the Dec. 29 West Hawaii Today further illustrates the fatalistic love affair between our Big Island roads and speeders. It is of little surprise that West Hawaii Today heard from people who complained that “police are operating a speed trap” on the Daniel K. Inouye Highway (Saddle Road); or that “there should’ve been a period … to educate rather than punish” speeders, including tourists.

One writer wrote that going over the speed limit “are often simple oversights.” Unbelievable.

Licensed motorists are assumed to be “educated” — that’s why all motorists are required to take a driver’s license exam. That license carries the responsibility to drive safely and obey posted speed limits.

What do we say to families who have lost loved ones because of speeding? Do we say: I’m sorry it’s an “educational” problem?

If the perceived “entrapment” saves lives, I say go for it. Let the cops do their job. We should stop romanticizing motorists who speed. Speeding kills.

Likeke Bumanglag

Kailua-Kona