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The way it was: Mauna Kea in 1945

| | Mar 29 2017 - 12:05am | Comments

We are kamaaina, born and raised in Hilo during the 1930s and 1940s. Bill, now living in Nevada, visited me here in Kona for the Christmas holidays and we traveled back on many old, sentimental journeys. One of the special ones was about his hike to the summit of Mauna Kea in 1945.

  1. | Posted: Dec 12 2013 - 1:00am

    WASHINGTON — The education of Barack Obama is a protracted process as he repeatedly alights upon the obvious with a sense of original discovery. In a recent MSNBC interview, he restocked his pantry of excuses for his disappointing results, announcing that “we have these big agencies, some of which are outdated, some of which are not designed properly”:

  2. | Posted: Dec 11 2013 - 1:00am

    I’ve heard a lot of goofy arguments against raising the federal minimum wage. The silliest goes like this: “You want to raise the minimum wage to $15? Why not $50? Why not $100?”

  3. | Posted: Dec 11 2013 - 1:00am

    I’ve heard a lot of goofy arguments against raising the federal minimum wage. The silliest goes like this: “You want to raise the minimum wage to $15? Why not $50? Why not $100?”

  4. | Posted: Dec 10 2013 - 12:06am

    WASHINGTON — One of the unpleasant side effects of modern medicine — experienced during a recent convalescence — is the omnipresence of television. Its controls are built into your hospital bed, just beside the nurse’s call button. The screen hovers over your head like an IV — drip, drip, drip — distracting, anesthetizing.

  5. | Posted: Dec 10 2013 - 12:06am

    While her friends dressed Barbie dolls, Lucy Sanders designed and constructed buildings with Lincoln Logs, Tinkertoys and playing cards. She learned physics by playing with her Slinky, and chemistry through her chemistry set. Sanders says that the board games she played with her family taught her strategy, empathy and how to win and lose. Her parents did get her a Barbie, but she and her sister turned her into “gladiator Barbie,” “medieval Barbie” and “superwoman Barbie.”

  6. | Posted: Dec 9 2013 - 12:05am

    WASHINGTON — For more than three decades, working class Americans receded as cultural heroes, replaced in the popular imagination by swashbuckling entrepreneurs, brilliant innovators, and shrewd investors who make millions at the touch of a computer key.

  7. | Posted: Dec 9 2013 - 12:05am

    WASHINGTON — For more than three decades, working class Americans receded as cultural heroes, replaced in the popular imagination by swashbuckling entrepreneurs, brilliant innovators, and shrewd investors who make millions at the touch of a computer key.

  8. | Posted: Dec 8 2013 - 12:06am

    Americans pride themselves on helping the distressed. They have indeed been generous when people and countries are in trouble. But our public and government have also been complacent in the face of massive human suffering. Recall Rwanda and Cambodia. More recently, the U.S. public has watched passively for well over two years the continuing destruction of a highly developed state: Syria, where more than 120,000 civilians have been killed and more than 6 million left homeless.

  9. | Posted: Dec 8 2013 - 12:06am

    Americans pride themselves on helping the distressed. They have indeed been generous when people and countries are in trouble. But our public and government have also been complacent in the face of massive human suffering. Recall Rwanda and Cambodia. More recently, the U.S. public has watched passively for well over two years the continuing destruction of a highly developed state: Syria, where more than 120,000 civilians have been killed and more than 6 million left homeless.

  10. | Posted: Dec 8 2013 - 12:06am

    WASHINGTON — In his disproportionate praise of the six-month agreement with Iran, Barack Obama said: “For the first time in nearly a decade, we have halted the progress of the Iranian nuclear program.” But if the program, now several decades old, had really been “halted” shortly after U.S. forces invaded neighboring Iraq, we would not be desperately pursuing agreements to stop it now, as about 10,000 centrifuges spin to enrich uranium.

  11. | Posted: Dec 7 2013 - 12:06am

    WASHINGTON — It was like going into the belly of the beast.

  12. | Posted: Dec 7 2013 - 12:06am

    WASHINGTON — It was like going into the belly of the beast.

  13. | Posted: Dec 6 2013 - 12:07am

    WASHINGTON — In my mid-20s, I had a new bride, a plum job on Capitol Hill, and, apparently, the beginnings of a cancerous tumor on my right kidney. For 20 or 25 years — the best estimate of my doctors — it accompanied me at birthdays and on holidays and at the delivery of my children. It was quiet and kept to itself. Undiscovered, it would have donned camouflage and killed me in the end.

  14. | Posted: Dec 6 2013 - 12:07am

    WASHINGTON — In my mid-20s, I had a new bride, a plum job on Capitol Hill, and, apparently, the beginnings of a cancerous tumor on my right kidney. For 20 or 25 years — the best estimate of my doctors — it accompanied me at birthdays and on holidays and at the delivery of my children. It was quiet and kept to itself. Undiscovered, it would have donned camouflage and killed me in the end.

  15. | Posted: Dec 5 2013 - 12:05am

    WASHINGTON — Critics of the agreement with Iran concerning its nuclear program are right about most things but wrong about the most important things. They understand the agreement’s manifest and manifold defects and its probable futility. Crucial components of Iran’s nuclear infrastructure remain. U.S. concessions intended to cultivate the Iranian regime’s “moderates” are another version of the fatal conceit that U.S. policy can manipulate other societies. As is the hope that easing economic sanctions will create an Iranian constituency demanding nuclear retreat in exchange for yet more economic relief. Critics are, however, wrong in thinking that any agreement could control Iran’s nuclear aspirations. And what critics consider the agreement’s three worst consequences are actually benefits.