Monday | September 25, 2017
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Tephra deposit names: Out with the old, in with the new

| | Sep 2 2017 - 10:56pm | Comments

Sometimes you just have to sit down and do it. Everyone is faced with this challenge at one time or another and scientists are no exception. Our research into the explosive history of Kilauea Volcano came to just such a head earlier this year.

  1. Posted: Jan 28 2016 - 1:00pm

    As part of Volcano Awareness Month, our January “Volcano Watch” articles are taking us on a geologic tour of the Hawaiian Islands. Today’s stop: Maui, as well as the islands of Lanai, Molokai, and Kahoolawe, all of which form Maui County.

  2. | Posted: Jan 18 2016 - 9:51am

    January is Volcano Awareness Month, during which our “Volcano Watch” articles are exploring the geology of the Hawaiian Islands. The series continues this week with a look at Oahu.

  3. | Posted: Jan 13 2016 - 4:02pm

    Throughout January, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in cooperation with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the University of Hawaii at Hilo will offer public talks around the island. For the complete schedule and details, visit HVO’s website at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  4. | Posted: Jan 4 2016 - 10:21am

    What do actor Mel Gibson, football quarterback Eli Manning, and Kilauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption at Puu Oo have in common? They all share the same birthday.

  5. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:34pm

    During the past weeks, West Hawaii Today has been taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week, the final edition of the series: Mahukona.

  6. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:33pm

    During the past weeks, West Hawaii Today has been taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week: Kohala Mountain. The final edition of this series publishes Nov. 23.

  7. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:32pm

    Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week: Mauna Kea.

  8. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:29pm

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Hualalai volcano.

  9. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:27pm

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Kilauea Volcano.

  10. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 11:03am

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Mauna Loa.

  11. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 11:02am

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Loihi Seamount.

  12. | Posted: Dec 20 2015 - 1:31am

    This time last year, Kilauea Volcano’s lava flow was threatening Pahoa. Today, the immediate danger to Puna communities no longer exists, but lava continues to erupt from the Puu Oo vent. So, while the flow is largely out of sight, it should not be totally out of mind.

  13. | Posted: Dec 13 2015 - 1:30am

    Many readers know that Hawaii Island is made of five volcanoes — Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Mauna Kea and Kohala. Those same readers know that such obvious features as the cones that dot Mauna Kea, the Halai Hills and Kulani Cone on Mauna Loa, and Kapoho Cone, Puu Oo and Mauna Ulu on Kilauea are places where eruptions took place. If that’s the case, then why aren’t they called volcanoes? Isn’t a volcano a place where lava reaches the surface of the Earth? Why doesn’t the island have hundreds of volcanoes instead of only five?

  14. | Posted: Dec 6 2015 - 1:30am

    Modern science could not exist without exchange of data and ideas. The exchange can be informal — at meetings and in casual conversations — or formal — in papers or books that can be studied and debated for years to come. The old axiom, publish or perish, is as true for science as it is for scientists.

  15. | Posted: Nov 29 2015 - 1:30am

    In early November, volcano scientists from Hawaii, Chile, Indonesia, Italy and Japan participated in a workshop at the Mount Fuji Research Institute in Japan. Talks and discussions during the workshop were focused on the best ways to protect tourists in active volcanic areas.