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What’s hot and not in lava field fashion

| | Apr 15 2017 - 8:37pm | Comments

An estimated 1,500 visitors a day hike across the lava flow fields to view the ocean entry and search for active lava breakouts. Round-trip walking distance is far; a one-way trip to the ocean entry from Kalapana is around 4 miles. Add the chase for active lava, milling about, and your hike will quickly add up to more than 10 miles when you return.

  1. | Posted: Feb 7 2016 - 1:30am

    In 1880-1881, a lava flow from Mauna Loa came very close to entering Hilo Bay. In trying to reconstruct the timeline of this flow for a recent Volcano Awareness Month presentation, we tracked down many old place names mentioned in newspaper reports of the lava’s progress. One such name that came up repeatedly is Kalanakamaa gulch (“kahawai o Kalanakamaa”).

  2. | Posted: Jan 31 2016 - 1:31am

    As the 2016 Volcano Awareness Month comes to an end, so too does our series of “Volcano Watch” articles exploring the geology of the Hawaiian Islands. This week, we conclude our journey with the Island of Hawaii.

  3. Posted: Jan 28 2016 - 1:00pm

    As part of Volcano Awareness Month, our January “Volcano Watch” articles are taking us on a geologic tour of the Hawaiian Islands. Today’s stop: Maui, as well as the islands of Lanai, Molokai, and Kahoolawe, all of which form Maui County.

  4. | Posted: Jan 18 2016 - 9:51am

    January is Volcano Awareness Month, during which our “Volcano Watch” articles are exploring the geology of the Hawaiian Islands. The series continues this week with a look at Oahu.

  5. | Posted: Jan 13 2016 - 4:02pm

    Throughout January, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in cooperation with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the University of Hawaii at Hilo will offer public talks around the island. For the complete schedule and details, visit HVO’s website at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  6. | Posted: Jan 4 2016 - 10:21am

    What do actor Mel Gibson, football quarterback Eli Manning, and Kilauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption at Puu Oo have in common? They all share the same birthday.

  7. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:34pm

    During the past weeks, West Hawaii Today has been taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week, the final edition of the series: Mahukona.

  8. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:33pm

    During the past weeks, West Hawaii Today has been taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week: Kohala Mountain. The final edition of this series publishes Nov. 23.

  9. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:32pm

    Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week: Mauna Kea.

  10. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:29pm

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Hualalai volcano.

  11. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 3:27pm

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Kilauea Volcano.

  12. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 11:03am

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Mauna Loa.

  13. | Posted: Dec 28 2015 - 11:02am

    Editor’s note: Over the next few weeks, West Hawaii Today will be taking a closer look at each of the volcanoes on and around Hawaii Island. This week is Loihi Seamount.

  14. | Posted: Dec 20 2015 - 1:31am

    This time last year, Kilauea Volcano’s lava flow was threatening Pahoa. Today, the immediate danger to Puna communities no longer exists, but lava continues to erupt from the Puu Oo vent. So, while the flow is largely out of sight, it should not be totally out of mind.

  15. | Posted: Dec 13 2015 - 1:30am

    Many readers know that Hawaii Island is made of five volcanoes — Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Mauna Kea and Kohala. Those same readers know that such obvious features as the cones that dot Mauna Kea, the Halai Hills and Kulani Cone on Mauna Loa, and Kapoho Cone, Puu Oo and Mauna Ulu on Kilauea are places where eruptions took place. If that’s the case, then why aren’t they called volcanoes? Isn’t a volcano a place where lava reaches the surface of the Earth? Why doesn’t the island have hundreds of volcanoes instead of only five?