Letters | 5-2-14


We need the military in Hawaii

It is indeed unfortunate that in our “civilized” world there are those who would engage in war and conflict to resolve their differences, promote their agenda, silence opposition and engage in genocide to increase their power and influence. Yet it happens every day over large swaths of the planet.

Nobody is more opposed to war than those who have seen it up close and personal. Those who have been in harm’s way. So I am writing this in response to James Donovan’s letter that was printed in the May 2 edition of West Hawaii Today.

Mr. Donovan writes, “Twenty years ago my wife and I had the opportunity for an early retirement, allowing us to choose the best place on Earth to live.” Later he says, “I wouldn’t have chosen to live near Pearl Harbor in 1941.” He closes by saying, “I came here to live my life in peace and to pass my ‘everything’ on to future generations. So, to whom this may concern, don’t bring your war here, please.”

I would ask Mr. Donovan just who he thinks has provided him with these opportunities? Granted he earned what he has through his own effort but I doubt he was ever in the military. And unless our military has declared war on itself, I don’t think they are bringing their war to Hawaii to conquer his way of life.

I think it’s safe to say that nobody would have wanted to live near Pearl Harbor in 1941 — or in New York in 2001. Though I supported the initial action in Afghanistan in 2001, I would not have wanted to live in Kabul that year — or ever for that matter. Nor would I have wanted to live in Baghdad or Fallujah, Iraq, in 2003. We as a nation have learned of the futility of both of those invasions. One warranted, the other completely unnecessary.

I am in no way a jingoistic citizen. I cringe when I hear the term “American Exceptionalism” uttered by people like Bill O’Reilly and his brethren who never saw fit to serve themselves.

So I would suggest to Mr. Donovan that he not forget or dismiss the millions who have died so he can have the freedom to pass all of his “everything” on and own his piece of paradise in Waikoloa — or why the military exists.

Greg Miller

Kona