Updated 

Forecasters watching low pressure systems south of Hawaii


Forecasters on Thursday continue to monitor two low pressure systems located far south of the Big Island.

The first area of low pressure is situated about 745 miles southeast of Hilo, according to forecasters. Isolated thunderstorms continue near the low, but there is little sign of organization. The system is moving slowly toward the west. Forecasters gave the system a 20 percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone during the coming 48 hours.

The second area of low pressure, located about 965 miles east-southwest of Honolulu, is showing little sign of development though isolated thunderstorms are located near the low, Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasters said Tuesday morning. Forecasters gave the system a zero percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

Elsewhere in the Central North Pacific Basin, no tropical cyclones are expected through Friday morning.

The Central North Pacific Basin is located between 140 degrees west longitude and the International Dateline. Central Pacific Hurricane Center officials predicted four to seven tropical cyclones this year in the Central North Pacific Basin. Overall, they give this season an 80 percent chance for a normal to above average number of tropical storms to form.

The Central Pacific hurricane season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30.